H-SC students present research at international cell biology conference

Three Hampden-Sydney biologists, Jay Brandt ’15, Chris Ferrante ’15, and Taylor Meinhardt ’16, accompanied Professor Mike Wolyniak to the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) in Philadelphia.  The ASCB Annual Meeting attracts roughly 8,000 scientists and exhibitors from around the world each December, including Nobel laureates and other top names in the field.  Jay and Chris presented their joint project on peptide synthesis as a potential novel form of antibiotic.  The research is both their Senior Fellowship project at H-SC and a semester-long classroom research opportunity in which Jay and Chris will work with Professor Wolyniak’s Genetics and Cell Biology class in the spring 2015 semester to collect and analyze data. First, Jay and Chris presented at the undergraduate poster session, featuring 150 different projects drawn across the full gamut of cell biology fields.

Chris Ferrante '15 and Jay Brandt '15 at the undergraduate poster presentation session

Chris Ferrante ’15 and Jay Brandt ’15 at the undergraduate poster presentation session

The site of the undergraduate poster presentation.  The Atrium of the Pennsylvania Convention Center was once the trainshed for the Reading Railroad.

The site of the undergraduate poster presentation. The Atrium of the Pennsylvania Convention Center was once the trainshed for the Reading Railroad.

Jay and Chris gave their presentation again two days later at the general session alongside  undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, and career scientists:

Representing Hampden-Sydney at the general session

Representing Hampden-Sydney at the general session

Professor Wolyniak gave a talk and a poster at the meeting about a new ASCB teaching mentorship program piloted at Hampden-Sydney last academic year which has potential to become a national model.  The meeting also gave students like Taylor interested in a career in biological research the opportunity to attend sessions on how to get into graduate school and select a research lab as well as take in the research activities of leaders in cell biology related fields.

There was also time to take in Philadelphia:

The Liberty Bell with Independence Hall in the background

The Liberty Bell with Independence Hall in the background

One of 4 eagles on the Market Street Bridge.  Originally from Penn Station in New York City, 22 identical eagles still exist today, including the 4 on this bridge and one on the H-SC campus.

One of four eagles on the Market Street Bridge. Originally from Penn Station in New York City, 22 identical eagles still exist today, including the four on this bridge and one on the H-SC campus.

Taylor, Prof. Wolyniak, Chris, and Jay....brotherly love in the City of Brotherly Love

Taylor, Prof. Wolyniak, Chris, and Jay….brotherly love in the City of Brotherly Love

Molecular biology students present their semester research at JMU’s “Phage Phaire”

The Fall 2014 Molecular and Cellular Biology class at Hampden-Sydney has been an active participant in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute SEA-PHAGES program, isolating and characterizing viruses that infect Bacillus bacteria as part of a nationwide project on viral evolution and genomics.  As part of this class experience, 5 students from the class prepared research presentations for the James Madison University “Phage Phaire”, a gathering of research students from James Madison, Virginia Commonwealth University, Old Dominion University, the University of Mary Washington, and Hampden-Sydney.  These 5 schools are part of the current 74-member nationwide HHMI SEA-PHAGES alliance and organize two research meetings per year to provide students with the chance to share their work with their peers.

Travis Goodloe '16 presents his work on BlakeE, a phage of Bacillus cereus discovered on the H-SC campus.

Travis Goodloe ’16 presents his work on BlakeE, a phage of Bacillus cereus discovered on the H-SC campus.

Spencer Wiles '15 presenting his work on Bacillus thuringiensis phage LargeMarge

Spencer Wiles ’15 presenting his work on Bacillus thuringiensis phage LargeMarge

 

Will Banning '15 with his work on B. thuringiensis page Precious (co-doscovered with Mitch Cavallarin '15)

Will Banning ’15 with his work on B. thuringiensis page Precious (co-doscovered with Mitch Cavallarin ’15)

Tucker Hudgins '15 presenting phage TuckHudge to Phage Phaire keynote speaker Dr. Daniel Nelson of the University of Maryland-College Park

Tucker Hudgins ’15 presenting phage TuckHudge to Phage Phaire keynote speaker Dr. Daniel Nelson of the University of Maryland-College Park

Dr. Lucia Barker of HHMI leans about phage Mavro from Corey Mavromatis '16

Dr. Lucia Barker of HHMI leans about phage Mavro from Corey Mavromatis ’16

Travis Goodloe ’16 received an award at the event for the best organized and designed poster from among all students, while Spencer Wiles ’15 received recognition for the meetings favorite phage name with “LargeMarge”.  The class will continue to work on characterizing their phages as the semester draws to a close and genomic sequences from the collected phages will be analyzed by H-SC students via bioinformatics.

Team H-SC with Mr. Madison on the JMU campus

Team H-SC with Mr. Madison on the JMU campus

 

2nd Annual Sigma Xi Symposium a Huge Success!

On November 13, the Longwood University/Hampden-Sydney College Chapter of Sigma Xi hosted the 2nd annual Sigma Xi Research Symposium.  Sigma Xi is an honorary research society that promotes excellence in scientific investigation in all fields of the life and physical sciences.  The Symposium was held at Longwood University’s Chichester Science Center and featured a keynote speaker and poster presentations by undergraduate students from both institutions.  Dr. Pieter deHart, Assistant Professor of Biology at the Virginia Military Institute, delivered the Symposium’s keynote address entitled ““Feeding the Beast:  Explorations into the Feeding Ecology of Apex Predators.”  This engaging talk focused on work that Dr. deHart has conducted with several undergraduate students at VMI and included ecological studies on the feeding habits of a wide variety of predators, ranging from praying mantids to coyotes.  Following his keynote address, Dr. deHart interacted with several students during the Symposium’s poster session, which featured research conducted by undergraduates at both Hampden-Sydney College and Longwood University.  12 H-SC students and 13 Longwood University students from the Departments of Biology and Chemistry presented their work, and this session provided an excellent opportunity for close interaction and sharing of ideas between students and faculty from both institutions.  To follow up on the success of the Symposium, Hampden-Sydney College will host an initiation ceremony in Spring 2015 for the induction of new student and faculty members to the Society.  

Keynote speaker Dr. Pieter deHart delivering his address to a full house!

Keynote speaker Dr. Pieter deHart delivering his address to a full house!

  

Just a sample of predators studied by Dr. deHart and his collaborating students!

Just a sample of predators studied by Dr. deHart and his collaborating students!

Dr. deHart interacting with students during the poster session

Longwood University student Jessica Littlefield presenting her research to Dr. deHart

Myshake Abdi '16 presenting his summer research to Wes Eure '16 and Jefferson Thompson '16

Jefferson Thompson ’16 (middle) presenting his summer research on free readicals to Myshake Abdi ’16 and Wes Eure ’16

Jay Brandt '15 presenting his research on immune responses to melanoma to James Lau'17

Jay Brandt ’15 presenting his research on immune responses to melanoma to James Lau’17

Stephen Woodall '15 explaining his research on prostate cancer to Dr. Nick Deifel from the H-SC Chemistry Department

Stephen Woodall ’15 explaining his research on prostate cancer to Dr. Nick Deifel from the H-SC Chemistry Department

Daniel Osarfo-Akoto learning about NKG2D signaling in T cells from tumor immunologists at Longwood University

Daniel Osarfo-Akoto ’15 learning about NKG2D signaling in T cells from Longwood University student and tumor immunologist Kelsey Trace

Several Longwood students presenting research conducting through the University's PRISM Summer Research Program

Several Longwood students presenting research conducting through the University’s PRISM Summer Research Program

Jay Brandt ’15 Presents Cancer Research at State Microbiology Meeting

On November 7, 2014 Jay Brandt ’15 presented his summer research at the Virginia Branch Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology at James Madison University.  Jay’s poster, entitled “Ex vivo Analysis of the Impact of Melanoma-altered Dendritic Cells on CD8+ T Cell Differentiation,” was based on his work through the H-SC Honors Council’s Summer Research Program.  Jay worked in collaboration with Elliott Assistant Professor of Biology Dr. Kristian M. Hargadon ’01 and studied the effector cytokine production and cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells stimulated by melanoma-altered dendritic cells.  Jay will be attending Eastern Virginia Medical School following his graduation in 2015!

Jay Brandt '15 presenting his poster!

Jay Brandt ’15 presenting his poster!

Bioethics expert visits H-SC from Providence College

The Biology Department was pleased to recently host Fr. Nicanor Austrico, Associate Professor of Biology at Providence College in Providence, Rhode Island and priest of the Dominican order of the Roman Catholic Church, to Hampden-Sydney.  Fr. Austriaco visited classes in bioethics and molecular and cellular biology before delivering a public seminar entitled “What Human Genomics Can Tell Us About Adam and Eve: A Catholic Perspective”

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Fr. Austriaco in H-SC’s bioethics freshman seminar

Fr. Austriaco runs an NIH-supported laboratory as Providence that focuses on mechanisms regulating cell suicide while also writing extensively on matters of science and faith.  In his interactions with students, Fr. Austriaco discussed several current issues in bioethics from his unique perspective as both a scientist and a priest.  Fr. Austriaco’s public seminar was part of the biology department’s Biology Colloquium series, where students, faculty, and outside guests present and discuss their research progress with the department’s students.

 

New growth chambers bring new research opportunities to H-SC Biology

The department is pleased to announce the arrival of two new growth chambers to the department equipment collection.  The chambers are the result of professor Mike Wolyniak’s National Science Foundation funding and provide precise environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, light intensity, etc.) for the growth and maintenance of plants.

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The new growth chambers in their new home in Gilmer Hall

Chambers such as these are essential to conducting controlled plant experiments that can be used for student and faculty research.  New plant-based experiments based on using the chambers are being planned for both spring 2015 coursework in the department and summer 2015 student/faculty research projects.

Jay Brandt ’15 receives travel award to present research at national meeting

Jay Brandt ’15 has received a $250 award to defer costs to attend the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) in Philadelphia, PA in December.  Jay will present his work along with Chris Ferrante ’15 and professor Mike Wolyniak on the synthesis of small peptides that may have antimicrobial properties against Gram positive bacteria.  The presentation will focus on both Jay and Chris’ results as well as the adaptation of their project for Dr. Wolyniak’s spring 2015 Genetics and Cell Biology course, where they will help lead the class in the development and analysis of bacterial growth experiments.  The ASCB Annual Meeting is one of the premier meetings available for the presentation of biological research to a large audience, attracting ~5,000 scientists from around the world to discuss their findings across all fields of molecular and cellular biology.

Drs. Werth and Shear write about “living fossils” for American Scientist magazine.

Dr. Alex Werth and Dr. Bill Shear of the Biology Department have published a feature article in the Sigma Xi magazine, American Scientist.  The article, entitled “The Evolutionary Truth About Living Fossils,” discusses the implications of the idea, first put forward by Darwin, that some organisms have persisted unchanged for milliions of years.  The article is prominently featured on the magazine’s cover with an illustration of a coelacanth, perhaps the most famous of “living fossils.”  In the article the two professors deconstruct the concept and show that even these antiquated-looking organisms have never stopped evolving and that in fact some of them have been shown to be evolving at rates that are among the most rapid for any organism.  They also use the “living fossil” idea to examine the crucial question of “what, if anything, is a species?”

Werth and Shear both earned PhD degrees at Harvard Univeristy, albeit 21 years apart, Shear in 1971 and Werth in 1992.  Dr. Werth studies the biomechanics of feeding in both baleen and toothed whales, and the evolution of complexity.  Dr. Shear is an authority on several groups of organisms, including millipedes and harvestmen,  and has studied the evolution of early terrestrial ecosystems.  This is his fifth feature article for American Scientist.  Dr. Werth currently serves as chair of the Biology Department; Dr. Shear will be retiring in July, 2015.

Read the article here: Living fossils

Dr. Kristian M. Hargadon ’01 Publishes Major Review Article on Dendritic Cells

Elliott Assistant Professor of Biology, Dr. Kristian M. Hargadon ’01, recently had a major review article published in the journal International Reviews of Immunology.  The article, entitled “Murine and Human Model Systems for the Study of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology,” highlights the tools and strategies employed by immunologists to study dendritic cells, a key regulatory cell type of the immune system that is critical for both the induction of immune activation and tolerance.  These cells play major roles in immunity to pathogens, transplant acceptance/rejection, autoimmunity, and anti-tumor immunity, and their impact on the field was the basis for the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine that was awarded to three investigators who discovered and offered in-depth functional characterization of these cells.  In addition to emphasizing methodologies that have enabled experimental analyses of dendritic cells, Dr. Hargadon’s review also offers insights as to how the model systems currently in use to study these cells might be manipulated going forward to gain better a better understanding of the development and function of dendritic cells.  International Reviews of Immunology is published by Informa Healthcare and is one of the leading review journals in the field of immunology.  Dr. Hargadon’s research program focuses on the modification of dendritic cell function by tumors and how tumor-altered dendritic cells impact the quality of anti-tumor T cell responses.

H-SC biology students showcase their summer research work at C-Day

Hampden-Sydney celebrated the start of the new academic year with C-Day, a day marked by the College’s opening convocation as well as events for each of the four classes.  C-Day was also an opportunity for 10 biologists to show the results of their summer research work at a poster session held during the community picnic on campus.  Of these 10 biologists, 9 worked directly with members of the H-SC biology department on campus over the summer while the tenth, Daniel Osarfo-Akoto ’15, did his work at Harvard Medical School in conjunction with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Exceptional Research Opportunities Program.  Many of these projects will continue in the coming academic year as students pursue these projects for academic credit and, in many cases, the production of an honors thesis.

Jay Brandt '15

Jay Brandt ’15

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Davis Carter ’15

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Kyle Deivert ’16

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Joshua Dimmick ’15

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Grayland Godfrey ’15

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Erik Kellogg ’15

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Sean Kellogg ’15

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Daniel Osarfo-Akoto ’15

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Harold Willis ’16

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Stephen Woodall ’15